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attorney-doug-warlickAttorney Douglas B. Warlick, who is also immediate past president of the Geneva Lions Club was awarded a crystal pin Service Award by the Lions Club International for his “World of Service”.

The World of Service Awards recognize Lions who represent our world of service. Projects and activities that are submitted should exemplify the objects of the association.

Douglas also received a 2nd award on January 13, from the Lions of Illinois Foundation for his achievements in growing the Geneva Lions Club which added 11 new members during his reign as President of the Club.

Spousal support, also referred to as alimony or spousal maintenance, refers to a person’s right to financial support from his or her spouse after a divorce. This support can exist in the form of money or assets. If you and your spouse are going through a divorce and considering spousal support, it’s important to be familiar with the different types of maintenance so you can determine what will best fit your situation.

spousal support, maintenance, alimony IMAGEIn some cases, the court may award permanent maintenance. This is sometimes awarded when the marriage was fairly lengthy or one spouse is unable to support themselves. Essentially, under this type of agreement, maintenance is received until one of the parties dies. However, the arrangement can still be altered and reviewed by the court for example, in the event that the recipient spouse gets remarried.

Another common type of maintenance is referred to as rehabilitative maintenance. Under these agreements, support is given to a spouse who needs time in order to establish financial independence. Rehabilitative maintenance typically includes a specified time frame and terminates when the recipient spouse is back on their feet. These agreements can also last for indefinite amounts of time and have periodic reviews. If it is determined that the recipient spouse is making the effort to establish financial independence maintenance can be terminated immediately. These agreements are common amongst marriages in which one spouse stayed home raising children and requires time to find a job or get training in order to return to the workforce.

Posted on in Family Law

Inner PeaceThe New Year can be a good time to reconsider a bad relationship. According to Psychology Today, this is why January is often called divorce month—there are more divorces filed nationwide in January than in any other month. “Some couples who’ve been planning to break up choose to avoid disrupting their families during the holidays. Others may be hoping that their situation or their partner’s behaviors will change, and when nothing shifts, they opt for dissolution,” reports Psychology Today.

According to the Huffington Post, some divorce scholars have attempted to determine an exact “D-Day,” the day on which more divorces happen than any other reason. One consultant told the Huffington Post that while people begin looking for information well before the holidays, “they can’t do much until the attorney are back in the office. January 12–16 seems to be the magic week for filings.”

Waiting until after the holidays to initiate proceedings is more common for families that have children. This, of course, is because couples that are anticipating divorce opt to stave it off in order to give “the kids one last happy holiday as in intact family. By January, if it’s still not working, they know it’s time to move on,” according to the Huffington Post. Divorce can be extremely difficult if you have children, regardless of how long you wait, according to Psychology Today. No matter when you break the news, whether you wait until after the New Year or not, “if you have children, you need to break the news to them gently and slowly.”

Posted on in Divorce

Passive Aggressive Behavior Leads to Divorce IMAGEIt’s not just infidelity that leads people to divorce anymore. In fact, according to research from the National Fatherhood Initiative and reported upon by MSN News, a lack of commitment and relentless arguing were actually the two most common reasons for divorce. Infidelity, long considered the most common reason for divorce, doesn’t seem like as big of a deal in 2013 as it has in the past century. A booming industry surrounds infidelity, with websites such as AshleyMadison.com actually providing a platform for people who want to have an extramarital affair. Perhaps this change in attitude is why less people view their partner being unfaithful as reason enough to split. But the surprising fact, according to the Huffington Post, is that an incredibly common behavior is most at fault for divorces in the U.S.

“In relationships,” reports the Huffington Post, “passive aggressive behaviors are often used to avoid the direct confrontation of short-term conflict, but in the long-term, these dynamics can even be more destructive to marriage than outright aggression.” Assertive communication can actually help save a marriage heading for divorce rather than spur it toward a split. Recognizing what passive aggressive behavior entails is the first step toward curtailing it and healing an otherwise unhealthy relationship.

There are several personality indicators that a person is suffering from extreme passive aggressiveness and recognizing any of them in your partner could help to mitigate a potential split. Typical passive aggressive behavior, according to the Huffington Post, can include (but is not limited to):

Posted on in Family Law

There have been some surprising findings about divorce throughout the last couple of years. One such thing was a Norwegian study that found that couples who share housework are more likely to divorce—a troubling finding in a world where women are only just beginning to play an equal role out of the home. A Swedish study found that there may actually be a gene in women that can predict divorce, as if some women are just predetermined to split, regardless of socioeconomic or family background. And just recently, a report first published by MyDivorcePapers.com, and reported on by the Huffington Post, “couples whose individual weights fall between 101 and 200 pounds are more likely to file for divorce.”  Overweight People Less Likely to Divorce IMAGE

The study was conducted by examining 2,708 divorce cases. More than three-quarters of the divorces (76 percent) involved individuals who weighed between 100 and 200 pounds. “In contrast, approximately 18 percent of cases involved couples in which a partner weighed between 201 to 250 pounds, and 5 percent involved couples in which a partner weighed more than 250 pounds.” The fact that overweight couples may file less for divorce wasn’t included, meaning that the study is not an indicator that overweight couples are more prone to marital happiness—it could only mean that they’re less likely to split in the event of it. It’s also important to note, states the Huffington Post that, “height was not included in the data analysis, and therefore some of the individuals in the 101 to 200 pound range may actually be considered overweight as well.”

According to an article published earlier this year in New York magazine and later speculated upon by the Huffington Post, weight gain may not just be a reason to stay in a marriage, but a reason that a person gets served divorce papers. The Huffington Post asks “Is divorcing your spouse because he or she put on some extra pounds going too far?” For many readers, the answer was no.

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