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Kane County child support attorneyWhen a couple with children divorces, the parent with less parental responsibility and parenting time is often ordered to pay child support by the court. Such a parent must make periodic payments to the other parent in order to help with child-rearing expenses. Since 1988, Illinois has allowed court-ordered child support payments to be paid through automatic income withholding. The amount of money that can be deducted from the payor’s paycheck is based on the Income Shares model. This method of determining child support takes into consideration both parents' incomes as well as the amount of parenting time and parental responsibility each parent has.

When a Parent Does Not Pay His or Her Required Child Support

Sometimes, for a countless number of reasons, parents are unable or unwilling to pay their court-ordered child support. When this occurs, the recipient parent, meaning the parent with more parental responsibility who is due support payments, can petition the court to address the problem. The state of Illinois has the authority to take child support obligations from other periodic payments such as worker’s compensation and unemployment benefits.

Geneva family law attorneyIn today’s world, it is not uncommon for a person to seek a fresh start by moving to a new city—sometimes even across the country. This may be particularly appealing after a divorce, as a new beginning may be cathartic in many ways. While the average American has the freedom to move wherever he or she wants at any time, such is not always the case for a divorced parent who shares parenting time of a child with a former spouse.

Rules for Relocating

The state of Illinois has established laws designed to help keep both parents active in the life of their child, even after a divorce. Regarding moving to a new city or state, Illinois law is clear. A parent with at least half of the parenting time of a child may only move with the child within a certain radius of his or her current home before the move is considered a “relocation.” A relocation requires the consent of the other parent or the approval of the court.

Kane County family law attorneysEvery day, hopeful men and women take a pregnancy test only to find out that they are still childless. Sometimes, infertility can be caused by an injury or genetics, and other times, a couple simply has trouble conceiving. Individuals may wish to have a child but, for a myriad of reasons, are not able to carry the child themselves. In these cases, many people turn to surrogacy to create the family of their dreams.

What Is Required of the Surrogate Mother and Intended Parents?

The state of Illinois passed The Illinois Gestational Surrogacy Act (IGSA) in 2005 in order to clarify the rights of both the future parents and the surrogate mother. It is important to note that this act only applies to instances where the surrogate mother is not also donating her reproductive egg cells in order to conceive the child. In order to benefit from the legal protections contained in the IGSA, intended mothers should either provide the egg cells themselves, of if this is not possible, find an egg donor separate from the surrogate mother.

Posted on in Divorce

Geneva divorce attorneyWhile the United States has made significant strides in the arena of gender equality in the last few decades, there is still quite a bit of work to be done, especially in terms of perception of rights or lack thereof. This is very clearly articulated in divorces, as several issues may come up during the process that affect women substantially more than men.

Financial Questions

Perhaps the most pressing concern for many women before and during a divorce is financial, because there are still a great many marriages where the husband handles the bulk of the financial decisions and assets. This is especially true if you and your spouse are older and were married during a time when women were less involved in anything outside the realm of child-rearing. While Illinois is an equitable distribution state, meaning that the marital estate will be divided between the spouses as fairly as possible, this does not take away the issues that can come along with being inexperienced in financial matters.  

Kane County family law attorneyWhile many parents would like to be able to simply end their ex’s right to be in their children’s lives, it is not possible in Illinois to do so unilaterally. Terminating a parent’s rights in Illinois is a process that requires the involvement of both parents in most cases, and in some situations, it can get extraordinarily complex. It is imperative, for the sake of your children, to ensure you understand the process before trying to assert your parental rights over those of their current caregivers.

When Can Rights Be Terminated?

In Illinois, there are very limited occasions on which a parent’s rights may be terminated. According to current law, there are only two: either in a case under the Adoption Act or in a juvenile court case. This may seem extreme, but Illinois legislators and courts have been firm in asserting that children benefit more from having both parents in their lives, unless the parent has been convicted of offenses that would signify their posing a danger to the child in question.

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