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Kane County juvenile criminal defense lawyerIn the United States, a person is considered a juvenile if he or she is under 18 years old. You may have heard the phrase “juvenile delinquency” before, but you may be unsure about what it actually means. It is generally defined as the repeated commitment of criminal offenses by a young person, typically one below the age at which traditional criminal prosecution is possible. In many instances where a crime was committed by a minor, a separate juvenile court system hears these cases and promotes rehabilitation as opposed to penalties such as jail time. Nonetheless, it is important to know that as an Illinois parent, you could be held liable for injuries or losses caused by your child’s actions.

Possible Penalties for Retail Theft by a Minor

Under Illinois law, shoplifting is also referred to as retail theft or larceny. The crime of shoplifting involves taking an item from a store or retailer with the intent to deprive the owner of its full or partial value. This can mean the offender places the product in his or her pocket or backpack without paying for it. It can also include switching price tags to make an item scan at a lower cost. 

Depending on the age and cooperation of the juvenile thief, the act of shoplifting may be handled in various ways. A store may or may not call the police or press charges. The child could get off with simply a warning. In most situations, the minor’s parents will be notified of the incident, and the retailer will likely prohibit the juvenile from entering the store again. Even if the authorities are called, a minor shoplifter who is taken to the police station may still only receive a warning if it is his or her first offense. 

Geneva family law attorneysEach year, hundreds of thousands of Americans get divorced. While the divorce rate is lower than it was a few decades ago, divorce is still common throughout the country. Despite, people seem hesitant to give up on finding love and marital bliss, even if their first marriage fails. In fact, a recent study found that a full 40 percent of marriages today include at least one person who has been married before. In about half of those marriages, both spouses are on their second, third, or subsequent marriage. It is estimated that about 60 percent of divorced or widowed Americans will eventually remarry.

Such numbers certainly seem to portray a level of optimism regarding how we approach marriage as a society. If you are considering getting married again after a divorce, however, there are some things you need to keep in mind, including:

  • Termination of spousal support: If you currently receive maintenance payments—also called alimony or spousal support—from your ex under the terms of your divorce settlement, getting remarried will almost certainly put an end to those payments. Under Illinois law, you moving in with your fiancé could be enough to terminate your ex’s maintenance obligation;
  • Parental responsibilities and parenting time: Your remarriage does not guarantee a change in your responsibilities regarding your children. However, parenting time schedules and other concerns related to child custody are based on the circumstances of each family. A remarriage could definitely change your circumstances, so modifications to your parenting plan could be necessary;
  • Child support payments: In most cases, getting remarried will not affect your child support obligations or your eligibility to continue receiving child support. The child’s parents are still responsible for supporting the child, regardless of the existence of new spouses. If, however, you decide to change jobs or stop working due to your new marriage, or if you have a child with your new spouse, those factors could affect child support; and
  • Inheritance rights: Do you have family heirlooms or important possessions that you want your children to receive when you die? If you do not formalize your wishes in a prenuptial agreement, it could be your new spouse who receives the property intended for your children.

As the old adage says, there are exceptions to almost every rule, so the considerations mentioned above should serve as a reminder of things to be aware of rather than advice for your unique situation.

Kane County relocation attorneysIn past generations, it was not terribly uncommon for a person to grow up in a given area and to spend the vast majority of his or her life in that same area. This was especially true in financially healthy regions where jobs and educational opportunities were readily available. Today, however, is a different story, as a people are much more likely to move greater distances than ever before. Some move for employment reasons, others for education, and still others just for a change in scenery. While moving is rarely easy, most adults have the freedom to relocate whenever they choose, but for those who are subject to an Illinois parenting plan, there are limits on how far a move can be.

Who Is Affected?

The state of Illinois is invested in looking out for the best interests of children—especially those whose parents have divorced or were never married. Thus, the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act (IMDMA) provides specific guidance for parents who wish to move to a new home. The IMDMA states that a parent who has the majority of the parenting time with their child or shares parenting time equally with the other parent must adhere to certain rules when considering a move.

Posted on in Adoption

Kane County adoption lawyersAdopting a child is one of the most rewarding things a couple can do. Not only are couples able to experience the joy and wonder of having a child, but they also giving a child in need a loving home. There are many different types of adoption available to Illinois residents. Some choose to adopt internationally while others seek a local adoption. Some choose to use an agency and others seek an independent adoption. Independent adoption, or private adoption, involves a direct arrangement between birth parents and adoptive parents. As with all types of adoption, independent adoption has its own advantages and challenges.

Potential Advantages

An independent adoption was portrayed in the 2007 movie Juno. In the film, a young girl gets pregnant unexpectedly and realizes that she is not capable of adequately caring for the baby. She finds a couple who is not able to conceive children, and she begins to arrange for them to adopt her child. This type of adoption process puts the control in the hands of the expectant mother and adoptive couple. They have the time to get to know ach other on a personal level.

Kane County family law attorneysIn the late 19th century, U.S. states began to see a series of causes of action referred to as “heart balm torts.” These torts, such as seduction and alienation of affection, hinged around the idea that one spouse could hold the other spouse’s lover liable for the breakup of their marriage. Nowadays, such causes of action have been abolished in most states, as they have been in Illinois since the beginning of 2016.

Definitions and History

Heart balm torts originated in the 19th century in the United States. While they began to fall out of favor as states passed their respective Married Women’s Property Acts, heart balm torts came about due to the general belief that a wife was her husband’s property. Thus—as was the belief—he alone enjoyed the exclusive right to her company and to sexual congress within the confines of marriage. Illinois passed its version of a heart balm act into law in 1901, somewhat later than many other states.

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