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Geneva divorce attorneysIf you are a parent of young children and you are getting divorced, you will undoubtedly have questions about how your divorce will affect your kids. While most children are eventually able to adapt to their parents’ post-divorce reality, it can be incredibly difficult to break the news to them. Talking about divorce is not easy, especially with children whose entire world is about to change, but experts offer some useful tips that can help you know what to say.

School Aged-Children Know More Than You Realize

If your children are between the ages of about 4 and 8, he or she probably knows other children whose parents are divorced, especially if your children go to school—including preschool. Your children may understand that not all families have both parents living in the same house, but their concerns are likely to revolve around how your decision will affect their lives directly. They may wonder if they will have to move or change schools, and when they will get to see each parent. You may not have the answers to these questions immediately, but that does not mean you should avoid telling your children what is about to happen.

Kane County divorce lawyersIf you and your spouse are considering or have decided to end your marriage through divorce, one of the questions you have probably asked yourself is, “How should I tell everyone?” While divorce is fairly common present day, many people still fear the judgement or disappointment divorce can bring. While there is no prefect way to tell others that your marriage is ending, experts do have some advice for making the conversations go as smoothly as possible.

You Do Not Owe Anyone an Explanation

Oftentimes, when a person tells friends and family the news of a divorce, the recipients of this information demand details. This can be very difficult for many people going through a divorce to deal with. You have the right to share or not share personal information about the divorce at your own pace. If people in your life are asking you to share more information than you are comfortable doing, simply say something along the lines of “I am not ready to talk about this yet, but thank you for your concern.”

Kane County family law attorneysEvery day, hopeful men and women take a pregnancy test only to find out that they are still childless. Sometimes, infertility can be caused by an injury or genetics, and other times, a couple simply has trouble conceiving. Individuals may wish to have a child but, for a myriad of reasons, are not able to carry the child themselves. In these cases, many people turn to surrogacy to create the family of their dreams.

What Is Required of the Surrogate Mother and Intended Parents?

The state of Illinois passed The Illinois Gestational Surrogacy Act (IGSA) in 2005 in order to clarify the rights of both the future parents and the surrogate mother. It is important to note that this act only applies to instances where the surrogate mother is not also donating her reproductive egg cells in order to conceive the child. In order to benefit from the legal protections contained in the IGSA, intended mothers should either provide the egg cells themselves, of if this is not possible, find an egg donor separate from the surrogate mother.

Geneva divorce attorneyWhen a couple gets divorced in Illinois, maintenance is not guaranteed for either spouse. Also known as alimony or spousal support, maintenance is only ordered by the court if such payments are found to be necessary and appropriate. In some cases, a divorcing couple will agree to maintenance terms on their own, and the court will typically approve these agreements as long as they are reasonable. When left up to the court, however, there must be a demonstrable need on the part of one spouse.

When determining whether award maintenance, the court must take into account more than a dozen factors, including each spouse’s age, health, income, earning potential, the length of the marriage, and the standard of living created during the union. Many of these factors address each spouse’s current situation, but according to the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act (IMDMA), there two specific considerations that deal with contributions and sacrifices made by a spouse in a supporting role as the primary homemaker or child-raiser.

“Any Impairment…”

Kane County family law attorneysPrenuptial agreements have gotten a bad rap for many years. Many hold the false belief that prenuptial agreements are only for celebrities or couples who do not believe in the longevity of their marriage. The reality is that a prenuptial agreement is a valuable legal tool as well as a great way to plan for a couple’s future. Prenups are not only a valuable tool if a marriage ends or one of the spouses passes away, but are also a good way to hammer out the details of how finances will be managed within the marriage.

Prenuptial Agreements Especially Popular with Younger Crowd

A survey conducted by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers suggests that the younger generation of married couples may be more likely to use prenuptial agreements than the older generations. In fact, of the total attorneys surveyed, 51 percent reported an increase in the amount of millennials requesting prenups within the last three years.

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