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Geneva family law attorneyDivorce is a different experience for everyone who goes through it. The particulars of how a marriage ends can be based on many factors including the financial situation of each spouse, the length of the marriage, if children are involved, and more. If you are planning to get divorced and you are the primary breadwinner of the couple, there are some special considerations that you should take note of.

Spousal Maintenance

Spousal maintenance, also called spousal support or alimony, refers to the payments that the higher-earning spouse pays to the lower-earning spouse after a divorce. Spousal maintenance in Illinois is determined on a case-by-case scenario for couples who have a large discrepancy in either income or life circumstances. If you make significantly more money than your soon-to-be-ex-spouse or they have been out of the workforce for a while, you might have to pay spousal maintenance. The amount the payments will be determined by the length and standard of living of the marriage, the spouses’ income and property, the present and future earning capacity of each spouse, and more. Maintenance payments can be temporary or permanent, but are not required after the person receiving maintenance remarries. 

Geneva family law attorneyIn today’s world, it is not uncommon for a person to seek a fresh start by moving to a new city—sometimes even across the country. This may be particularly appealing after a divorce, as a new beginning may be cathartic in many ways. While the average American has the freedom to move wherever he or she wants at any time, such is not always the case for a divorced parent who shares parenting time of a child with a former spouse.

Rules for Relocating

The state of Illinois has established laws designed to help keep both parents active in the life of their child, even after a divorce. Regarding moving to a new city or state, Illinois law is clear. A parent with at least half of the parenting time of a child may only move with the child within a certain radius of his or her current home before the move is considered a “relocation.” A relocation requires the consent of the other parent or the approval of the court.

Geneva divorce attorneysIf you are a parent of young children and you are getting divorced, you will undoubtedly have questions about how your divorce will affect your kids. While most children are eventually able to adapt to their parents’ post-divorce reality, it can be incredibly difficult to break the news to them. Talking about divorce is not easy, especially with children whose entire world is about to change, but experts offer some useful tips that can help you know what to say.

School Aged-Children Know More Than You Realize

If your children are between the ages of about 4 and 8, he or she probably knows other children whose parents are divorced, especially if your children go to school—including preschool. Your children may understand that not all families have both parents living in the same house, but their concerns are likely to revolve around how your decision will affect their lives directly. They may wonder if they will have to move or change schools, and when they will get to see each parent. You may not have the answers to these questions immediately, but that does not mean you should avoid telling your children what is about to happen.

Kane County divorce lawyersIf you and your spouse are considering or have decided to end your marriage through divorce, one of the questions you have probably asked yourself is, “How should I tell everyone?” While divorce is fairly common present day, many people still fear the judgement or disappointment divorce can bring. While there is no prefect way to tell others that your marriage is ending, experts do have some advice for making the conversations go as smoothly as possible.

You Do Not Owe Anyone an Explanation

Oftentimes, when a person tells friends and family the news of a divorce, the recipients of this information demand details. This can be very difficult for many people going through a divorce to deal with. You have the right to share or not share personal information about the divorce at your own pace. If people in your life are asking you to share more information than you are comfortable doing, simply say something along the lines of “I am not ready to talk about this yet, but thank you for your concern.”

Kane County family law attorneysEvery day, hopeful men and women take a pregnancy test only to find out that they are still childless. Sometimes, infertility can be caused by an injury or genetics, and other times, a couple simply has trouble conceiving. Individuals may wish to have a child but, for a myriad of reasons, are not able to carry the child themselves. In these cases, many people turn to surrogacy to create the family of their dreams.

What Is Required of the Surrogate Mother and Intended Parents?

The state of Illinois passed The Illinois Gestational Surrogacy Act (IGSA) in 2005 in order to clarify the rights of both the future parents and the surrogate mother. It is important to note that this act only applies to instances where the surrogate mother is not also donating her reproductive egg cells in order to conceive the child. In order to benefit from the legal protections contained in the IGSA, intended mothers should either provide the egg cells themselves, of if this is not possible, find an egg donor separate from the surrogate mother.

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